IRISE RAGE
S5E9 - The Past Informs the Present: Addressing DU’s Colonial Roots and the Pioneer Moniker

S5E9 - The Past Informs the Present: Addressing DU’s Colonial Roots and the Pioneer Moniker

May 2, 2022

The Legacy Series explores the lived experiences and impact of student leaders at The University of Denver (DU). This series has three goals:

-Center decolonization and inform the DU community of DU’s colonial roots and perpetuation of racism, hate, and discrimination
-Memorialize the resilience and brilliance of student leaders and their allies, offering a behind-the-scenes of their labor
-Alert the DU community to the harms that are continually inflicted upon student leaders at the University of Denver

At a foundational level, a large portion of the activism at DU has sought to force DU to acknowledge and confront its colonial roots and perpetuation of colonialism and racism. Many who join the DU community are unfamiliar with the history of The Sand Creek Massacre as well as the founder of DU, John Evans', culpability for the massacre. This history is imperative to understand the continued demand to remove the pioneer nickname at the University of Denver. 

More Information and Resources: https://theragepodcast.com/legacy-part-one-the-past-informs-the-present-addressing-dus-colonial-roots/

Related Episodes: https://theragepodcast.com/tag/rememberxlegacyseries/

S5E8 - Through the Love That We Grow: A Conversation on Environmental Justice, Collaboration, and Self-Care

S5E8 - Through the Love That We Grow: A Conversation on Environmental Justice, Collaboration, and Self-Care

April 11, 2022

Summary: Host Caris Fox and upcoming host for the RAGE Podcast, Micaela Parker, are joined by guest Ean Thomas Tafoya, the Colorado director of Green Latinos, to further dive into conversations about the climate crisis and advocacy for environmental justice. In this episode, Ean Thomas Tafoya discusses the importance of art as a tool for social justice, collaboration, and self-care. Additionally, Tafoya highlights the impact of a recent decision by Colorado state officials to not cut greenhouse gas emissions from large manufacturers until 2023. This episode also discusses the importance of centering intersectionality in combating the climate crisis, water as a source of life that should be shared indiscriminately among communities, and the power of staying true to oneself.

Resources:

Ean Tafoya’s Website: https://eantafoya.com/

A Call for Climate Justice: https://udenver.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8qVHM3216Pf4ZIa

Green Latinos’ Website: https://www.greenlatinos.org/

Colorado Environmental Protection Task Force: https://cdphe.colorado.gov/environmental-justice

 

 
 
S5E7 - ”If You Want the History of a White Man, You Go to the Library”: A Conversation on Archives at the University of Denver

S5E7 - ”If You Want the History of a White Man, You Go to the Library”: A Conversation on Archives at the University of Denver

February 22, 2022

Summary: Host Caris Fox and guests Denisse Solis, Lauren Turner, and Katherine Crowe of Anderson Academic Commons at the University of Denver discuss the power of archives as sites of racial confrontation and reconciliation. Libraries are modern and historical examples of institutional racism as the stories of white, cis-gendered, non-disabled, and heterosexual men are systematically prioritized, resulting in the exclusion of works by Black, Indigenous, and other People of Color (BIPOC). The Anderson Academic Commons library at the University of Denver is no different. Solis, Turner, and Crowe center inclusion, ethics, care, and equity in their archival practices to capture the authentic stories of BIPOC students and their activism at DU while fighting for institutional change. 

Resources: 

The RAGE Website: theragepodcast.com 

Special Collections and Archives: https://library.du.edu/collections-library-materials/special-collections-archives/research-help

Crimson Connect: https://crimsonconnect.du.edu/home_login

Denisse Solis: https://operations.du.edu/irise/content/about/faculty-directory/denisse-solis

Lauren Turner: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lauren-s-turner/

Katherine Crowe: https://katherine-crowe.com/about/

 

 

 

S5E6 - Refusing Death: Immigrant Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice in LA

S5E6 - Refusing Death: Immigrant Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice in LA

February 8, 2022
Summary: 
Host Caris Fox and guest Dr. Nadia Kim discuss Dr. Kim’s new book Refusing Death: Immigrant Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice in LA. While Los Angeles is popularly known as the city of Hollywood, glamor, and the Kardashians, unbeknownst to most people, LA is also the city of oil and contains one of the biggest ports in North America. This episode includes a discussion about the impacts of neoliberalism and nativism in perpetuating environmental INjustice, the intersection of race, class, gender, and citizenship, and defines and expands on biopower, bioneglect, and emotive power.
 
Links:
Dr. Kim's Website: http://nadiakimacademic.net/
Refusing Death: Asian and Latina Immigrant Women Activists on Race, Class, and Morality Lecture: https://youtu.be/RO86SpMhf_o
 
S5E5 - To Deny Water is to Deny Life: A Conversation on Ecojustice, Water, and Environmental Racism

S5E5 - To Deny Water is to Deny Life: A Conversation on Ecojustice, Water, and Environmental Racism

January 18, 2022
Summary: Host Caris Fox and guest Dr. Miguel De La Torre introduce Dr. De La Torre's book Gonna Trouble the Water: Ecojustice, Water, and Environmental Racism. Dr. De La Torre emphasizes the importance of Indigenous perspectives and approaches in properly caring for the Earth and its inhabitants. Additional topics from this episode include environmental racism and the erasure of those with marginalized identities from the study of environmental justice; the intersection of capitalism and the eurocentric commodification of the Earth and its resources; the harmful and, at times, deadly health crises perpetuated by abuse to the environment; how the COVID pandemic has exacerbated and highlighted issues about injustice to the environment.  
 
Links: 
Dr. Miguel De La Torre's website and publication information:  http://drmigueldelatorre.com/
S5E4 - Celebrating Our Treasures: A Conversation on Educational Equity

S5E4 - Celebrating Our Treasures: A Conversation on Educational Equity

January 4, 2022

Summary: Host Caris Fox and guest Dr. Maria del Carmen Salazar explore the unique challenges facing students with marginalized identities in the education system and offer holistic solutions to establish true educational equity.

Links:

Teacher Evaluation as Cultural Practice: A Framework for Equity and Excellence: https://www.amazon.com/Teacher-Evaluation-Cultural-Practice-Excellence-ebook/dp/B07N1WSRGT

NMU Humanising Pedagogy Webinar with Prof Maria Salazarhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUWhlpeO6X4&feature=emb_title

 

S5E3 - Institutional Justice Series Part III: A History of Gang Violence in Denver, CO

S5E3 - Institutional Justice Series Part III: A History of Gang Violence in Denver, CO

November 11, 2021
Host Caris Fox and guest Julian Rubinstein, author of The Holly: Five Bullets, One Gun, and the Struggle to Save an American Neighborhood, discuss the Shakespearean-like history of gang violence in Denver, Colorado. This episode also examines the intimate relationship between the media and law enforcement in creating and controlling the narratives that surround gang violence in Denver. Rubinstein exposes the interdependence of gang violence and law enforcement budget increases, the effects of anti-gang initiatives funded by law enforcement, and the failure of Denver-based media outlets to accept accountability for problematic behavior and reporting about gangs.
 
Links: 
Julian Rubinstein Webstie: http://www.julianrubinstein.com/
S5E2 - Institutional Justice Series Part II: Holistic Solutions to End Gun Violence in the US

S5E2 - Institutional Justice Series Part II: Holistic Solutions to End Gun Violence in the US

November 1, 2021
Host Caris Fox and New Yorkers Against Gun Violence’s Shaina Harrison and Frank Teah deconstruct popular misconceptions about gun ownership and gun violence in the United States. This episode explores the artificial power that guns offer youth as a tool to fight against feelings of powerlessness and fear. How would America be positively transformed if systems of oppression such as poverty and racism were dismantled and replaced with transformative justice and community-based practices? What alternatives to gun ownership are present when community building is at the forefront, ensuring that the community feels seen, heard, protected, and empowered? Listen to part two of the Institutional Justice Series for answers to these questions and much more.  
 
Link: 
New Yorkers Against Gun Violence: https://nyagv.org/
S5E1 - Institutional Justice Series Part I: Strategic Racism and Racial Justice

S5E1 - Institutional Justice Series Part I: Strategic Racism and Racial Justice

October 5, 2021
Host Caris Fox and guest Jim Freeman introduce the role of systemic and strategic racism in the conversation about policing, mass incarceration, anti-immigrant policies, and the mass criminalization of Black, Indigenous, and Communities of Color (BIPOC). This episode highlights the importance of and offers resources to support grassroots movements with interdisciplinary assistance to end gun violence and advocate for police abolition. Lastly, Freeman introduces a summary of his book, Rich Thanks to Racism, and how the ultra-wealthy profit from the imprisonment of BIPOC bodies.
 
Links: 
Jim Freeman's Website: https://www.jimofreeman.com/
Rich Thanks to Racism: https://www.jimofreeman.com/book
 

 

 

 
 
 
S4E10 - From Veganism to Incarceration: Food Justice, Exploitation, and the Abuse of Bodies

S4E10 - From Veganism to Incarceration: Food Justice, Exploitation, and the Abuse of Bodies

June 14, 2021
Host Caris Fox and guests Dr. Jessica Ordaz and Dr. Lauren DeCarvalho discuss veganism, food justice, and the incarceration system. Dr. Ordaz introduces the writing process and history behind her new book, The Shadow of El Centro: A History of Migrant Incarceration and Solidarity. Dr. DeCarvalho deconstructs the representation of prisons and female inmates in film and the role that film plays in molding public opinions about incarceration and those incarcerated. This episode also examines the parallels between the food industry and the incarceration system regarding the abuse of bodies and exploitation for profit. Lastly, Dr. Ordaz and Dr. DeCarvalho address popular narratives about the legality and illegality of persons and “justified” imprisonment. 
 
Links: 
Dr. Ordaz Website: https://www.jessica-ordaz.com/
Dr. Lauren DeCarvalho Website: http://www.laurenjdecarvalho.com/
Social Justice Living and Learning Community: https://www.du.edu/livinglearning/socialjustice/
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